The 5 Amazon Credit Cards Reviewed (What Amazon doesn’t want you to know)

There are 5 different Amazon credit cards and let’s find out which one is right for you. Getting 5% back on all your Amazon purchases is pretty good but then you also have to consider the cost of having Amazon Prime and if the service justifies the cost.

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The 5 Amazon Credit Cards:

Amazon Store Card

  • Bank: Synchrony
  • Credit Score Needed: 640 or higher
  • Annual Fee: None
  • Sign up Bonus: $60 Amazon Gift Card
  • Cashback:
    • 5% on Amazon with Prime membership.
    • No cashback if you don’t have Amazon Prime.
    • No cashback on any purchases outside of Amazon Prime.
  • Customer Experience: Bad. After reading the recent reviews for Synchrony Bank, they don’t have the best customer experience and they don’t have a very transparent system when it comes to payments and fees.
  • Sign Up (and reviews): Link
  • Overall: Synchrony bank approves a lot of people with low credit scores. Since the card has no annual fee, it’s a great way of establishing your credit. If you already have a good credit score, I would skip directly to the Amazon credit cards by Chase and American Express. Check out the reviews for Synchrony bank through the Amazon link and you’ll see a lot of unhappy customers (recent reviews). The customer service and experience of using Synchrony seems pretty bad.

Chase Amazon Visa Signature Card

  • Bank: Chase
  • Credit Score Needed: 700 or higher
  • Annual Fee: None
  • Sign up Bonus: $60 Amazon Gift Card
  • Cashback:
    • 3% at Amazon and Whole Foods
    • 2% at restaurants, gas stations and drugstores
    • 1% on everything else
  • Reviews: https://www.amazon.com/Amazon-Rewards-Visa-Signature-Card/dp/B007URFTYI
  • Sign Up: Link
  • Overall: Pretty good card to start building your credit history and a banking relationship with Chase.

Chase Amazon Prime Visa Signature Card

Amazon Business American Express Card

  • Bank: American Express
  • Credit Score Needed: 670+ (business credit score)
  • Annual Fee: None
  • Sign up Bonus: $100 Amazon gift card
  • Cashback:
    • 3% at Amazon, Amazon Business, AWS, and Whole Foods
    • 2% at restaurants, gas stations and wireless phone providers
    • 1% on everything else
  • Reviews: https://www.amazon.com/Amazon-Business-American-Express-Card/dp/B07984JN3L
  • Sign Up: Link
  • Overall: The Amazon business AMEX card offers a higher sign up bonus and still has no annual fee. It’s pretty good to get but of course, you’ll need to have a business to be eligible.

Amazon Business Prime American Express Card

  • Bank: American Express
  • Credit Score Needed: 670+ (business credit score)
  • Annual Fee: None
  • Sign up Bonus: $125 Amazon gift card
  • Cashback:
    • 5% at Amazon, Amazon Business, AWS, and Whole Foods
    • 2% at restaurants, gas stations and wireless phone providers
    • 1% on everything else
  • Customer Experience: The Amazon Prime business credit card is issued by American Express and are known for their outstanding service. Once you have an American Express card it makes it easy to get more. Personally, I’ve had over 20 different AMEX cards and they’ve always had excellent customer service.
  • Sign Up: Link
  • Overall: Great for businesses that use Amazon Prime to get 5% back.

How much is Amazon Prime? Amazon Prime Membership Fees:

I HIGHLY recommend getting the Amazon Prime Free trial then applying for the Amazon credit card. If you have Amazon Prime at the time of your Amazon credit card application, you’ll be eligible for the Amazon Prime sign up bonus ($100 instead of $60 for the Chase Amazon credit card). When you get rid of your Amazon Prime, the credit card will just have 3% back instead of 5% back, but you’ll be $40 richer…you sly summabi…

How much do you have to spend to make the Amazon Prime credit card worth it?

With the difference being 2% cashback (3% for standard Amazon and 5% for prime), you’ll need to spend $5950 (on 5% categories) to make the Amazon Prime credit card worth it for the annual Prime membership. Here’s the numbers:

Amazon Prime Monthly User $12.99:

  • Non-Prime Credit Card 3%: $520 to get $15.60 in cashback
  • Prime Credit Card 5%: $520 to get $28.59 in cashback and to breakeven with $12.99/monthly Amazon Prime membership
  • $520 is the breakeven point. Spend more than $520 and you should upgrade to Prime for 5% cashback. Less than $520 in a month means the 3% is better without the membership fee.

Amazon Prime Yearly Payment $119:

  • Non-Prime Credit Card 3%: $5,950 to get $178.50 in cashback
  • Prime Credit Card 5%: $5,950 to get $297.50 in cashback and to breakeven with $119/yearly Amazon Prime membership
  • $5,950 is the breakeven point. Spend more than $5,950 and you should upgrade to Prime for 5% cashback. Less than $5,950 in a month means the 3% is better without the membership fee.

For casual Amazon shoppers that spend less than $6,000 annually, you’ll be better off with the 3% Amazon card and supplementing your shopping with the 5% category bonuses from the Chase Freedom and Discover It credit card.

Upgrading/Downgrading from Amazon Prime:

What happens to my Amazon Prime credit card after I cancel my Amazon Prime membership? I initially had Amazon Prime and the Chase Amazon Prime credit card, after getting rid of my Amazon Prime membership my credit card was downgraded to the Amazon Visa Rewards card (not Prime). The only difference was that I was getting only 3% at Amazon instead of 5% on my purchases. I contacted Chase about this and was informed that if I get Amazon Prime again and link the card to Amazon, the card would automatically be upgraded back to 5% cashback on Amazon.

Which Amazon credit card I like the most?

Personally, I don’t spend more than $6000 at Amazon. Probably closer to the less than $1000 range, so the 3% cashback Chase Amazon Rewards card makes more sense to me. But, that’s only if I had to choose from one of the five Amazon credit card options.

If you have good credit (over 700), don’t bother getting the Amazon Synchrony credit card. I know they market it as the “Amazon store card” but Synchrony bank provides poor rewards, bad service and low credit limits. For those of you with a credit score under 700, then it makes more sense to get Synchrony Bank Amazon card until you can level up to the Chase version.

For the alternatives, I like both the Discover IT card and the Chase Freedom card. Both have no annual fee and get 5% rotating quarters (you need to activate it manually FYI) and Amazon happens to be on the list every year. These cards are both part of my “keep open forever” credit cards since it drastically helps your credit history.

Amazon store cad (I can’t use their actual logo)

Alternatives to the Amazon Prime credit card?

Chase Freedom: Every year, the Chase Freedom card has a rotating 5% categories every 3 months. Amazon happens to be one of the bonus categories every year so you get 5% back on your Amazon purchases for up to $1500 ($75 in cashback) in spend for the designated 3 months. To be eligible for this bonus, you’ll need to activate the bonus category on the Chase website because you won’t automatically get the bonus. This is a pretty good deal because the Chase Freedom card has no annual fee.

Discover IT: Discover also has a 5% cashback category bonus each quarter with Amazon being one those eligible bonus categories. You’ll get 5% back on purchases for up to $1500 ($75 in cashback). To be eligible for this bonus, you’ll need to activate the bonus category on the Discover website because you won’t automatically get the bonus. This is a pretty good deal because the Discover It card has no annual fee.

American Express Blue Cash Preferred: All other cards mentioned have no annual fee, so it’s going to sound strange that I’m recommending another credit card with an annual fee of $95. The AMEX BCP gets 6% back on grocery stores for up to $6,000 in purchases every year (max value of $360 in cashback at 6%). Since the grocery stores sell Amazon gift cards, you can buy Amazon gift cards at the grocery store to get 6% back on your Amazon purchases. It’s an indirect way of getting more value from your Amazon purchases without having to pay for Amazon Prime.

Although, since you will be using gift cards for your Amazon purchases instead of directly using your AMEX credit card, you will not have any additional purchase protection or warranty on your Amazon purchases. You still have all the standard Amazon consumer protection with all of your Amazon purchases (ex: 30-day return window).

Doing the math:

  • AMEX BCP (6%): Spend $5950 gets you $262 (After $95 credit card annual fee)
  • Amazon Credit Card (3%): Spend $5950 gets you $178.50
  • Amazon Prime Credit Card (5%): Spend $5950 gets you $178.50 (After $119 Amazon Prime fee)

Which Amazon credit card is right for you?

If you’re a pretty casual Amazon shopper (less than $6000 annually), I would recommend getting the Chase Amazon credit card (3% back), the Chase Freedom card (5% back: available 3 months out of the year), and the Discover IT card (5% back: available 3 months out of the year). Each of those has no annual fee. The good thing is that all 3 of these credit cards have no annual fee. This means they are great credit cards to keep open forever so you can build your credit history.

I had Amazon prime for several years, but didn’t do the math. My Amazon spend was much less than $1000/year and I had Amazon Prime. If you get a lot of value from the Amazon Prime membership, it can be worth it, but that depends on how much you actually value it. If you are an Amazon seller or pay for Amazon Web Services, the Amazon Business Credit card could be pretty useful to you.

TLDR

From the 5 Amazon credit cards, 2 of them are business credit card and 3 of them are consumer cards. From the consumer Amazon credit cards, 2 of them you can only get if you have Amazon Prime but will give you 5% back on all your Amazon purchases. While the Chase Amazon Rewards credit card (non-Prime) will give you 3% back. For you to offset the Amazon Prime fee with the 5% back in relation to the 3% back Amazon card, you’d have to spend at least $5950 at Amazon annually.

The difference between the Amazon Prime card and non-Prime card is that you need to have Amazon Prime to get 5% cashback at Amazon. In the event that you have Amazon Prime when you get the Amazon Prime Store card and then downgrade to non-Prime, your credit card will change from 5% Amazon cashback to 3%. That’s the major difference between the Prime card and non-Prime card.

But, if you are going to get the Amazon credit card, I highly recommend getting Amazon Prime (free trial) and then applying for the Amazon Prime card. The Amazon Prime credit card comes with a $100 sign-up bonus while the non-Prime comes with a $60 sign up bonus. It’s worth signing up for the 30-day free Amazon trial just to get that extra free cash.

The best alternatives to the Amazon Prime Credit Cards are the Chase Freedom and the Discover It credit card. Both have no annual fees and a rotating quarterly bonuses that include Amazon at 5% cashback for up to $1500. Each quarter last 3 months and the Chase Freedom and Discover It are on different quarters for the Amazon bonus. That means you’ll have 6 months of 5% cashback from Amazon throughout the year. Not bad.